automobilist:

1959 Pontiac Star Chief (Bethany Beach, Del.)

Bethany Beach is one of Delaware’s nicest towns and certainly the greatest town on the face of the planet to have been founded by the Disciples of Christ. It may not be as well-known as nearby Rehoboth Beach with its large gay community, and Beltway holidaymakers, but it is every bit as pleasingly quiet as Dewey Beach is obnoxiously rowdy and Ocean City, Maryland, is crowded and commercialized. Doubtless this is attributable, at least in part, to Bethany’s having been a dry town for most of its existence. It was not until 1982 that liquor could be served at all and even today bars are too few in number to attract the rabble.

What is more, some of its residents get permanent “Platinum” parking passes. The owner of this Pontiac seems to have got the first one.

petercmartucci:

Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Delaware Bay, Prime Hook Beach, Delaware.     Beautiful peaceful day walking the trails and watching the egrets fish.     This is a major area for the breeding of the Florida wading birds, Egrets, Herons, and Ibis, including Glossy Ibis.

searchingforamerica:

Rockwood Mansion in Wilmington, Delaware. Built between 1851 and 1854 Rockwood was a Gothic revival style “retirement” home for Joseph Shipley, a wealthy banker who spent much of his life in England. The design was inspired by Shipley’s English country home, Wyncote. When completed Shipley moved his entire English household to Rockwood. The home is currently part of a 6 acre park including gardens and walking paths in the gardenesque style. Rockwood features much of Shipley’s original furnishings and is open to the public for tours and special events. #searchingforamerica #oldhouses #delaware #wilmingtondelaware #mansions #gothicrevival #englishcountryhomes #historichomes #shipley #gardenesque #americanhistory #architecture #19thcentury (at Rockwood Mansion in Wilmington Delaware)

dudeshithappens:

Sunset 😍 #slaughterbeach #delaware #sunset

countrygirl823:

#Throwback of my visit to #Delaware two weekends ago to see the lovely @vivelabookworm ! Finally got to visit the University of Delaware!! #Thanks Coll and Liz! You are the best! #UDel #Newark #DE #BlueHens #soulmates #reunited #love #summer #adventures #tbt (at University of Delaware)

freeze21:

Dogfish Head Craft Brewery - Milton, DE - July 2014.

4 Things You Didn’t Know About Millsboro, DE

christophercompanies:

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With its charming downtown area, relaxing way of life, waterfront lifestyle, friendly atmosphere and ideal location, Millsboro is the perfect place to call home in southern Delaware. At Christopher Companies, we couldn’t be happier to have our townhomes in the waterfront community of Wharton’s Bluff, located in the charming town of Millsboro and in the heart of Delaware’s Sussex County.

If you think you know all there is to know about Millsboro, think again! Here are four fun facts about the town that you probably didn’t know:

  1. Impressive population growth. The population of Millsboro has increased 64.3% over the past decade, according to information from the Delaware Census State Data Center. And with all of the great aspects of living in Millsboro, we’re not surprised! The town still remains quaint, however, with population at the 2010 Census at almost 4,000. According to Millsboro.org, it’s the fastest growing community in the state and the largest community in central Southern Delaware.
  2. Rich history. In the local area, there are almost a dozen sites that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places – making the area very rich in history indeed! These nationally registered historic places include farm houses, schools and churches dating from as early as the mid-1800s. Many of these historic places are associated with the Native American heritage of the area – specifically, of the Indian River Nanticoke tribe. In fact, the Nanticoke Indian Museum that you’ve probably seen in Millsboro (picture above) is actually a historic former school building!
  3. Water, water, everywhere. Located along Delaware’s Indian River, there’s plenty of waterfront area to take advantage of for fishing, crabbing, boating, or just relaxing! In fact, about 11% of the total area of the town is water. We’re lucky enough to have a prime slice of Millsboro’s waterfront in Wharton’s Bluff. It’s one of the biggest benefits to living in our newly built townhomes – beautiful views of the Indian River for an unbeatable price!
  4. What’s in a name? The area now known as Millsboro used be named Rock Hole Mills because of the annual spawning of rockfish in the Indian River, and the name “Millsboro” – originally spelled “Millsborough” – was named for the sawmills and gristmills that were abundant in the area in the 1800s. Millsborough was originally only the area on the northeastern side of the Indian River, and it combined with the southwestern side of the river – originally known as Washington and what is now downtown Millsboro – in 1837 when the two towns merged as one.

Millsboro residents will tell you that there’s a lot to love about this charming southern Delaware town, and with our newly built townhomes on the Indian River, the list of great things in Millsboro just got a little longer! For those wishing to enjoy all the benefits of Delaware and of Millsboro, our Wharton’s Bluff townhomes offer the opportunity for waterfront living in one of Sussex County’s most charming towns for an excellent price you won’t find anywhere else!

SOURCE: MarketWatch, Delaware Census, Millsboro.org, Coastal Point

lightonthelake:

Valley life

supplyside:

U.S. Air Force C-5M Super Galaxy aircraft are shown at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, January 3rd, 2014

foodhistoricsites:

Delaware Peach Girls

 ”A key factor in this migrant work force (of the Delaware peach industry) was the “Peach Girls.” Usually in the 16 to 20 year old age group, they were recruited from large cities thru advertisements in the newspapers. John Harris’ Round Top Farm had over 600 peach girls working on it in 1875.

Since they were poor with few job opportunities they were easy prey for the advertisements that promised they could earn $1.50 to $2.00 per day and only pay $2.00 a week for board. On arriving at Round Tree they found the situation to be different than advertised. Instead of $1.50 per day they worked 15 hours for fifteen to twenty cents a day. Their board consisted of a bale of hay to sleep on and for food it was left over fruit. They simply did not have the money to return home nor was there much chance of earning the money to return.

Round Tree was but one example; many “peach girls” were treated better on other farms and actually paid an acceptable wage of around one dollar per day.”  Read on about the Delaware peach business here.

THEME