The State of Delaware

It's Good Being First
udelhistpres:

Save This Old House: Delaware Georgian Farmhouse
An article from This Old House Magazine discussing the Kux-Alrichs House. The house is free but must be moved. Any takers?

udelhistpres:

Save This Old House: Delaware Georgian Farmhouse

An article from This Old House Magazine discussing the Kux-Alrichs House. The house is free but must be moved. Any takers?

shitjustgotserious:

Pictures from Battery Park in Delaware.

forbiddenforrest:

The Glow in the Grass by jeffsmallwood on Flickr.

forbiddenforrest:

The Glow in the Grass by jeffsmallwood on Flickr.

a-cup-of-rain:

Cannons at Fort Delaware, a civil war prison

petercmartucci:

Fort Delaware, located on Pea Patch Island, Delaware Bay,built to protect the entrance of the Delaware River and the main channel to Philadelphia.      It was used as a prisoner of war camp during the Civil war for Confederate Prisoners.    Thousands of prisoners were housed here and several thousand died here.   One of the prison buildings has been reproduced showing how the prisoners  lived.  Union Officers quarters were in the main building.     They had all of the conveniences of home and the officer’s families in many cases lived there with the officers.      The paper wrapped packages were for clothing supplied to the prisoners.     Featured on ‘Ghost Hunters’ as their most haunted site.     

a-cup-of-rain:

Fort Delaware, a civil war prison

a-cup-of-rain:

Fort Delaware, a civil war prison

maptacular:

This Map Shows Where People Most Hate Their TaxesRead more: http://www.businessinsider.com/map-taxes-gallup-2014-4#ixzz2yO0Cmtj3

maptacular:

This Map Shows Where People Most Hate Their Taxes

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/map-taxes-gallup-2014-4#ixzz2yO0Cmtj3

ekomancer:

DELAWARE - FARNHURST ASYLUM
Eugenics:
There were 945 forced sterilizations in Delaware. Of the victims, 50% were female and 50% were male. Close to one third of those sterilized were considered mentally ill, while more than two thirds were considered mentally deficient. Delaware ranks 13th in the United States for number of documented sterilizations. Sterilization in Delaware occurred between 1923 and 1963.
Delaware sterilization laws included habitual criminals, those who were “chronically insane”, homosexuals, inmates of mental institutions who were “insane, feeble minded or epileptic”, and “those committing criminal acts in or outside of Delaware as a result of mental defectiveness.
Cemetery:
The cemetery lies at the back of the campus. Individual graves are marked with small numbered stones - there is only one grave marked with a private stone showing a name. There are 776 numbered stones arranged in concentric circles. The cemetery includes many people who were patients at the hospital and died there, but also includes some hospital employees as well as community members who were neither patients nor employees. Currently, the hand-written cemetery records of who is buried where, and when, is being transcribed into a searchable database; however, due to federal HIPAA regulations, this information cannot be made public.

ekomancer:

DELAWARE - FARNHURST ASYLUM

Eugenics:

There were 945 forced sterilizations in Delaware. Of the victims, 50% were female and 50% were male. Close to one third of those sterilized were considered mentally ill, while more than two thirds were considered mentally deficient. Delaware ranks 13th in the United States for number of documented sterilizations. Sterilization in Delaware occurred between 1923 and 1963.

Delaware sterilization laws included habitual criminals, those who were “chronically insane”, homosexuals, inmates of mental institutions who were “insane, feeble minded or epileptic”, and “those committing criminal acts in or outside of Delaware as a result of mental defectiveness.

Cemetery:

The cemetery lies at the back of the campus. Individual graves are marked with small numbered stones - there is only one grave marked with a private stone showing a name. There are 776 numbered stones arranged in concentric circles. The cemetery includes many people who were patients at the hospital and died there, but also includes some hospital employees as well as community members who were neither patients nor employees. Currently, the hand-written cemetery records of who is buried where, and when, is being transcribed into a searchable database; however, due to federal HIPAA regulations, this information cannot be made public.

ekomancer:

DELAWARE - BELMONT HALL
"Belmont Hall in Smyrna is one of the most historic buildings in the state. During the American Revolution a guard was fatally shot on "the Captain’s Walk" while guarding the building. His spirit is said to remain in the building and legend has it that his blood is still evident where he collapsed, and then later died, on the second floor."
“One thing about Belmont Hall — we always had a place to come to,” Speakman said of his former home. “It has this great feeling of permanence, of being there through the centuries.”
"Belmont Hall earned its place in history during the Revolutionary War, when the legislature met there several times because the early capital, New Castle, was too dangerous.
The war also gave Belmont Hall its ghost — a Colonial soldier, standing watch on the widow’s walk, who was shot by British soldiers coming up Duck Creek. He ran downstairs to warn others, and died in a pool of blood at the foot of the stairway. As recently as the mid-1960s, Speakman’s mother showed visitors the blood stains on the wooden floor.”

ekomancer:

DELAWARE - BELMONT HALL

"Belmont Hall in Smyrna is one of the most historic buildings in the state. During the American Revolution a guard was fatally shot on "the Captain’s Walk" while guarding the building. His spirit is said to remain in the building and legend has it that his blood is still evident where he collapsed, and then later died, on the second floor."

“One thing about Belmont Hall — we always had a place to come to,” Speakman said of his former home. “It has this great feeling of permanence, of being there through the centuries.”

"Belmont Hall earned its place in history during the Revolutionary War, when the legislature met there several times because the early capital, New Castle, was too dangerous.

The war also gave Belmont Hall its ghost — a Colonial soldier, standing watch on the widow’s walk, who was shot by British soldiers coming up Duck Creek. He ran downstairs to warn others, and died in a pool of blood at the foot of the stairway. As recently as the mid-1960s, Speakman’s mother showed visitors the blood stains on the wooden floor.”